Jerry West Digital Collection

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David was an older brother of basketball star Jerry West. He was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service after dragging a fellow soldier from a rice paddy after he was hit. David died in the Korean War at age 22 when Jerry was 12.
West (No. 44) poses on the right with West Virginia University basketball coach Fred Schaus (center) and Willie Akers (left).
West (No. 44) is pictured midair as he prepares to shoot two of his overall thirty-nine points at the game against VMI. The Mountaineers won with a 101-71 victory.
West, left, and Akers, right, pose with an unidentified young girl.
A group of men are gathered at a spring banquet held at Hotel Morgan after the West Virginia University basketball team was ranked No. 1 in the United States.In the front row, from left to right, is unidentified, Jerry West, Bobby Joe Smith, Ronnie Retton, Bucky Bolyard, Butch Gude, Jim Warren, and possibly Willie Akers.In the second row, from left to right, is athletic director Red Brown, basketball referee Red Mahalic, Jody Gardner, Loyd Sherer, Don Vincent, Whitie Guyme, team physician Dr. Sam Morris, Golf-pro Reggie Spencer, and Father Scott.In the third row, from left to right, is University of Pittsburgh basketball coach Doc Cartson, WVU head coach Fred Schaus, unidentified, the team's general manager Mr. Gwair, and unidentified.
West, pictured in the light sweater behind the cash register, listens as a cashier rings up his meal.In his book, "West by West: My Charmed, Tormented Life", West captions this photograph: "I may look innocent here, but I would occasionally play pranks in the dining hall."
West played as the team's starting small forward. He was named All-State from 1953–56, then All-American in 1956 when he was West Virginia Player of the Year, becoming the state's first high-school player to score more than 900 points in a season.He would go on to play for West Virginia University from 1956-1960, and then for the Los Angeles Lakers from 1960-1974.
In the front row, left to right, are Coach Tony Gentile (Williamson), Butch Goode (Pineville), George Ritchey (Chattaroy), Jay Jacobs (Morgantown), Mickey Neal (Williamson), Ed Christie (Clarksburg-Washington Irving), Coach Tony Folio (Clarksburg-Washington Irving).  In the back row, left to right, are Jim Warren (Clarksburg-Washington Irving), Jerry West (East Bank), Howard Hurt (Beckley), Jim McDonald (Bridgeport), Carl Johnson (Williamson), Willie Akers (Mullens), Larry Brothers (Parkersburg), and an unidentified manager.
In the top row, from left to right, is Turk Sine, Kenny Mikes, unidentified, Jerry West, unidentified, Frank Knight, and Walter Nook Smittle, Jr.In the bottom row, from left to right, is Larry Sine, Bucky Bolyard, unidentified, and Jon Huffman.
West lead the East Bank High School basketball team to secure it's first ever state championship title as the team's starting small forward.  He was named All-State from 1953–56, then All-American in 1956 when he was West Virginia Player of the Year, becoming the state's first high-school player to score more than 900 points in a season.He went on to play for West Virginia University from 1956-1960 and then for the Los Angeles Lakers from 1960-1974.
East Bank High School basketball coach Roy E. Williams, right, shakes the hand of Jerry West, left, in the dressing room after beating Mullens High School in Morgantown and winning the state championship title.West was East Bank's starting small forward. He was named All-State from 1953–56, then All-American in 1956 when he was West Virginia Player of the Year, becoming the state's first high-school player to score more than 900 points in a season.
Williams, right, seems to be telling his star, Jerry West, left, not to worry after West fouled out of the game with 5:27 minutes left to play.West lead East Bank High School to secure its first ever state championship title as the team's starting small forward. He was named All-State from 1953–56, then All-American in 1956 when he was West Virginia Player of the Year, becoming the state's first high-school player to score more than 900 points in a season.